NAPOLÉON III (Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte,...

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NAPOLÉON III (Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte,...

NAPOLÉON III (Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, future). Napoleonic ideas. London, Henri Colburn, 1839. In-8, viii-229-(1 white) pp. in 8, viii-229-(1 white) pp. in glazed tobacco calf, smooth threaded back with garnet title piece, gilded net framing the dishes, redone back, rubbed cups (English binding of the time). First edition (Kircheisen, t. II, p. 11). Signed autograph to Miss Atwell as proof of my gratitude for the verses she wrote about my mother. Napoleon Louis B. London, 1. Jan. 1840 "Attached, a handwritten notebook of the dedicatee, dated 1891 (5 ff. in-8, in English), in which she recounts the circumstances of the sending: friend of the Irish painter Nicholas Joseph Crowley, she had the opportunity to meet several times, in London, Prince Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte in exile while he posed for a portrait. It was following their conversations that she composed the three poems mentioned in the letter, which were copied in this issue. A touchstone of conquering bonapartism, this political essay was published by Prince Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte while he remained in exile in London after his first unsuccessful coup attempt in Strasbourg. While bonapartism, which was diverse but mainly adopted by liberals, was dying for lack of a leader, the ambitious Prince Louis-Napoleon Bonaparte acknowledged the passivity of the head of the family Joseph Bonaparte, and personally took up the challenge. He acted with intelligence and pragmatism, modernized the movement, and launched it into the conquest of power: "On the whole, the ideas of the suitor are not fundamentally different from the first bonapartism: "popular" sovereignty and representative system in the person of the leader, freedom well understood and authority are always the essential poles" (Thierry Lentz). However, as the historian later pointed out, the prince introduced social aspects that could win the support of the workers, and did not forget to flatter the rural populations among whom the Napoleonic legend was most vivid. Napoleonic Ideas thus laid the foundations of this doctrine, which was to be successful in 1848, when the future Napoleon III was to be elected President of the Republic, a prelude to the rebuilding of the Empire.
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